Scholarship

Books

Slavery and Reform In West Africa: Toward Emancipation In Nineteenth-Century (Senegal and the Gold Coast)

Slavery and Reform In West Africa: Toward Emancipation In Nineteenth-Century (Senegal and the Gold Coast)
Slavery and Reform In West Africa: Toward Emancipation In Nineteenth-Century (Senegal and the Gold Coast)

Slavery and its Legacy in Ghana and the Diaspora

Slavery and its Legacy in Ghana and the Diaspora
Slavery and its Legacy in Ghana and the Diaspora

A Primer for Teaching African History. Ten Design Principles

A Primer for Teaching African History. Ten Design Principles
A Primer for Teaching African History. Ten Design Principles

The Long Nineteenth Century 1750-1914

The Long Nineteenth Century 1750-1914
The Long Nineteenth Century 1750-1914

Exchanges: A Global History Reader (volume 2)

Exchanges: A Global History Reader (volume 2)
Exchanges: A Global History Reader (volume 2)

Exchanges: A Global History Reader (volume 1)

Exchanges: A Global History Reader (volume 1)
Exchanges: A Global History Reader (volume 1)

Empires and Colonies in the Modern World

Empires and Colonies in the Modern World
Empires and Colonies in the Modern World

African Voices of the Global Past

African Voices of the Global Past
African Voices of the Global Past

Cosmopolitan Africa

Cosmopolitan Africa
Cosmopolitan Africa

African Histories: New Sources and New Techniques for Studying African Pasts

African Histories: New Sources and New Techniques for Studying African Pasts
African Histories: New Sources and New Techniques for Studying African Pasts

Abina and the Important Men, a Graphic History

Abina and the Important Men, a Graphic History
Abina and the Important Men, a Graphic History

African History

One major thread running through my research is the effort to excavate the discursive worlds and lived experiences of nineteenth century West Africans and make them accessible to contemporary African and American students, scholars, and publics. As well as peer-reviewed publications in the journals Ghana Studies, Slavery & Abolition, and The Journal of West African History, and scholarly books such as Slavery and Reform in West Africa (Ohio) and Slavery and its Legacy in Ghana and the Diaspora (Bloomsbury, 2018, with Rebecca Shumway), my work in nineteenth century West African history forms the basis of the educational graphic history (comic book) Abina and the Important Men (Oxford 2012) which won the American Historical Association’s James Harvey Robinson prize and the CABA Book Award for Older Readers. My work in this area now revolves around addressing key problems in education in Africa. Based on a plenty rather than a poverty model, my approach is to collaborate with educators to employ local history and indigenous knowledge systems in the classroom. My work on the Fante Confederation, an 1867–1873 political movement, culminated this summer in a series of public museum exhibits in which I brought the archive into schools and markets in Ghana in an interactive format that invited the public to engage with state-sanctioned and scholarly interpretations and then create their own historical interpretations. This project revealed a deep network of knowledge and power transactions stretching from the halls of government to the classroom to the public square, and is currently being considered for publication in article form in History in Africa (with Tony Yeboah and Lindsay Ehrisman).

World History

Like many of my peers, I was only introduced to world history when I arrived at my first teaching position and was suddenly required to expand my focus from two small parts of Africa in the nineteenth century to thousands of years on a global scale. Since those early years, I have found that my dual roles as a world historian and as an Africanist complement each other but also lead to intersecting critiques of the two fields. In the process, I have become something of a critical voice on universalist, ecumenical world history and a proponent of an approach to the global past that engages a broader swath of history and heritage practitioners. In 2008, I was awarded a Fulbright fellowship to study African approaches to world history, which resulted in a number of publications such as “Towards an Historical Sociology of World History” and “World History and the Rainbow Nation: Educating Values in the United States and South Africa.” Recently, I authored a chapter about intersections between world history and heritage practices in a volume in honor of Jerry Bentley, which was just published by Hawaii University Press. At the same time, I’m making creative contributions to world history, the most recent being Empires and Colonies in the Modern World: A Global History (with Heather Streets-Salter) and The Long Nineteenth Century, 1750-1914: The Crucible of Modernity.

History & Comics

With the publication of Abina and the Important Men in 2012, I entered the world of graphic histories – intentional accounts of the past depicted through sequential, juxtaposed art and text. I have been invited to edit a special article-length review section of the American Historical Review on this medium. In addition to this work and a number of conference papers, I have become seriously engaged in the scholarship of teaching and learning in this area. While comics and graphic histories of all kinds have made their way into the social studies classroom, little serious work has been done on effective methodologies for employing sequential art-and-text to promote students’ acquisition and internalization of core history and social studies competencies. I’m gradually preparing a study focused on teachers’ use of comics in the history classroom, with the eventual goal of producing work that informs evidence-based pedagogy utilizing comics in the classroom.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

All of my work comes together in the area of scholarship around pedagogy and curriculum. Whether through world history contributions such as “Teaching World History at the College Level” in A Companion to World History, interventions in African history such as A Primer for Teaching African History and African Histories: New Sources and New Techniques for Studying African Pasts (with Esperanza Brizuela-Garcia), as well as documentaries and consulting for the New York City Board of Education and BCG3, my work stresses intentional design and high-impact practices for student success and achievement.